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Ahmed Karahisari – احمد شمس ا لدين قراهسارى

Elhamdülillâh + Müselsel Besmele + İhlâs Sûresi

Elhamdülillâh + Müselsel Besmele + İhlâs Sûresi

Ahmed Karahisari (1468–1566) was an Ottoman calligrapher.

Karahisari was born in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey. Unlike most of the Ottoman calligraphers of his era he did not follow the style of Sheikh Hamdullah, but adopted the trend of Yakut-ı Mustasımi. He created the best examples of the script varieties of Thuluth and Naskh. However, apart from his students, this style was not widely accepted.

His most important work is the Quran which he penned for Suleiman the Magnificent (reigned 1520-1566), which is preserved today at the Topkapi Palace.

In terms of the technique and innovations made to the calligraphy, he is considered one of the most important three Ottoman calligraphers along with Sheikh Hamdullah and Hâfiz Osman.

Basmala is executed in thuluth in a style called muusalsal (an Arabic term meaning chained or continuous) written without lifting the pen and in one continuous line.

Basmala is executed in thuluth in a style called muusalsal (an Arabic term meaning chained or continuous) written without lifting the pen and in one continuous line.

 

Among the followers of Karahisari style his student Hasan Çelebi is renowned as much as himself.

He died in Istanbul.

Sources:
Islamic art. B. Barbara (1991). British Museum Press. p. 240.
Sacred Script: Muhaqqaq in Islamic Calligraphy, N. Mansour, M. Allen. p.180.

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Mehmed Izzet Effendi (1841 – 1903)

Mehmed Izzet Effendi was born in Istanbul in 1257 H. We do not know from whom he received his icazet, but he is known to have written a very beautiful Thuluth and Naskhi and to have written the Rik’a script in a very pleasing style peculiar to himself. He taught writing in various schools including Galatasaray Lycee. Two of his books of calligraphy models for students have been published. The inscription on the dome of the German Fountain in Sultanahmet bears his signature. He died in 1320 and was buried in the Yahya Effendi cemetery in Besiktas.

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Thuluth Script

Thuluth Script was first formulated in the 7th century AD during the Umayyad caliphate, but it did not develop fully until the late 9th century AD. The name means ‘a third’ — perhaps because of the proportion of straight lines to curves, or perhaps because the script was a third the size of another popular contemporary script. Though rarely used for writing the Holy Qur’an, Thuluth has enjoyed enormous popularity as an ornamental script for calligraphic inscriptions, titles, headings and colophons. It is still the most important of all the ornamental scripts.

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